Alaska

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Safari photo tips & FREE Alaskan safari giveaway!

_djc7631hWe’re excited to let you know that our friends at Datacolor have announced a new contest open to everyone, with the first p

Nikon DSLRs over the years: From the Nikon D1 to the Nikon D4

ma_griz_32111I was fortunate enough to be able to shoot with a Nikon D4 on my recent Alaska photo safaris. It was a blast, and allowed me to get some great images that I probably wouldn’t have gotten with previous DSLRs – especially those requiring High ISO shooting. It gave me the chance to reflect back on the last 12 years of my photography of bears in Alaska, starting with film and progressing through the D1 and nearly every other Nikon DSLR since. I put my thoughts together in an article for Extremetech on how the improvements in DSLRs have enhanced our ability to photograph. Read more »

Pro Tip: Setting the scene with a flight shot

_djc1740When we usually think of flight shots we think of birds against a gorgeous blue sky. Sure, those are classic, but showing a bird’s environment can be even more dramatic. In the case of Horned Puffins, which live in the cold seas off Alaska, the snow-covered mountains ringing the coast make a great backdrop. Unfortunately, with the traditional background-isolating technique of wide-open aperture, any mountains caught in the frame would be blurred beyond recognition. Fortunately we had plenty of opportunities to capture colorful horned and tufted puffins in flight on our recent Alaska bear and puffin photo safari. Read more »

The Eyes Have It

_djc0509If there was one thing I could impress upon wildlife photographers, it is the importance of eyes. As humans, we are programmed to key in on eyes, whether they are human or animal. Sharp, interesting, focused eyes can make a photo. Bears clamming is no longer unusual, but bears clamming and looking up enough for a good view of their eyes, is. Here the eyes are tack sharp, and are clearly focused on a subject of interest to the bear (in this case another bear, which might prove an ally or rival in its clamming project). Read more »

Wildlife photography: Eye level matters

_djc8687Once we reach the age of about twelve, it stops becoming fun for most of us to drop down to the ground and pop back up. So there needs to be a good reason to get down low and haul ourselves back up – especially with a lot of photo gear. Shooting at eye level is one very good reason. We relate much better to animals at our own level. This goes for every critter, from birds to elephants, but is most important for mammals, and especially large predators. Lions, leopards, and bears just don’t look as imposing if we are staring down at them…