Cardinal Photo

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Sigma 24-105mm f4 Global Vision Lens Delivers the Goods in our Field Test

by David Cardinal

There is no question that Sigma has really upped its game with its new family of Global Vision lenses. I love the GV-version of the Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 OS HSM Lens, and continue to feel it is the world’s best lens for vehicle-based wildlife photography. This month I’ve had the pleasure of shooting with its new Sigma 24-105mm OS HSM Lens on both a Nikon D4S and a Nikon D7100. The short version is that the lens lives up to the Global Vision brand, but read on to see whether it might be the right mid-range zoom for you:


Wacom’s Cintiq Companion: Hands-on with the all-in-one mobile darkroom for pros

I’ve been using a Wacom Cintiq Companion off and on for the last few weeks to do my image review & editing. It is a gorgeous – expensive – Wacom-enabled 12” Windows 8.1 tablet that can run full-on Adobe Creative Suite applications.

Hands-on with the retro Nikon Df DSLR: Great fun in an awkward package

Nikon Df DSLR Camera with 50mm f/1.8 Lens (Silver)I’ve been shooting almost exclusively with the Nikon Df DSLR for the last month. When I crouch behind the retro-styled body and snap off shots that will be captured on the excellent D4 sensor, I feel like it could be the ultimate street photography camera. It is quick enough (5.5 fps), has world-class image quality, and is about half the size and weight of a Nikon D4. Besides, I figure it looks cool, and I certainly get some odd glances as if to say “is that a film camera you’re using?” My euphoria lasts until I need to change a setting. That’s where the retro design gets in the way. Read on and I’ll help you decide if the Nikon Df needs to be in your camera bag or in your collection… Read more »

Using Adobe’s Adjustment Brush in Photoshop or Lightroom to rescue awkwardly-lit scenes

_djc9137adjDespite the power of post-processing tools, one area that has always been labor intensive and error-prone is correcting images that have multiple light sources with multiple color temperatures. Since white balance is best set on the raw image, correcting for two or more different light sources has required “developing” the image multiple times and then using layers and layer masking to composite a version that shows each area lit correctly. Fortunately Adobe has changed all that… Read more »