Myanmar travel

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Quick tip: Taming the sun with a Multiply layer in Photoshop

Pl_ShweYanPanMonastery_0116mulSometimes you just can’t control the clock or the sun. The monastery in Nyaung Shwe (in Myanmar’s Shan State) is famous for its historic round wood windows. But finding them with novices peering out from the study hall inside was a special treat. Harsh light or not, it was a great photo opportunity. Having a Nikon D810 certainly helped me capture the full tonal range of the image from light to dark, but another trick was needed to make the image look good…

The amazing “one-legged” fishermen of Inle Lake, Myanmar (Burma)

_djc3037dxo_cvInle Lake in Myanmar is famous for its “one-legged” fishermen. They perform the seemingly impossible feat of rowing (and steering) their small, teak-hulled, wooden boats with one leg wrapped around a single oar while managing to fish with a net at the same time.
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Chin women in Myanmar: Last of their kind

_djc3754Urban legend has it that the women on the Chin underwent the painful process of having their faces tattooed with buffalo blood to make them less attractive, and

George Orwell’s House: The Ultimate Future B&B

Former home of the British Club in Katha, setting for much of George Orwell's novel, Burmese DaysTucked away in a corner of Myanmar (Burma) away from most tourists is the once sleepy town of Katha. Famous mostly in the West as where George Orwell was last stationed in Burma, and in the literary world as the setting for his novel, Burmese Days, the town is now something of a trading hub on the Irrawaddy River. Somewhat lost in the town’s growth are the house in which Orwell lived, and the home of the British Club – center of social life during the Colonial period and central to the novel. Read more »

Myanmar: History and Highlights of a changing country

pl_mandalayoldpalace_0009--by Ed Reinke

After the recent easing of sanctions by the U.S. government and moves toward greater political inclusiveness and democratization, Myanmar is back as a tourist destination for many Americans who were put off by the sanctions (which never banned travel by U.S. citizens) or by the entreaties of Myanmar activists, including Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, to avoid dealings which could help the military regime. Now that you can go, the question is why should you go. Quite simply, Myanmar is a beautiful, relatively unspoiled country, with friendly people and an amazing wealth of historic sites and natural beauty.

Our tour leaders, David Cardinal and myself, Edwin Reinke, have been travelling to Myanmar – often still called Burma by Westerners -- and leading tours there since 2005, and our experience has enabled us to pick the best spots… Read more »