Tips

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Lightening up your photo kit: Lenses I no longer travel with…

The Sigma 300-800 is an excellent and unique telephoto zoom, but it is huge & heavy -- no fun to travel withI’m often asked what lenses I recommend for various photo subjects – typically right before a reader or client is about to head off on a trip. What often goes without saying is what lenses I don’t travel with. In many cases, these were my “go-to” lenses for many years, but a combination of industry trends has helped me lighten up my traveling kit substantially. The changes aren’t for everyone, but they are worth considering for anyone who has begun to dread traveling with all their gear. Before I plunge in, please remember that I’m not saying these lenses aren’t still some of my favorites, or that you shouldn’t rely on them anywhere and everywhere, just that it is always worth thinking about what you are traveling with and why…


Safari photo tips & FREE Alaskan safari giveaway!

_djc7631hWe’re excited to let you know that our friends at Datacolor have announced a new contest open to everyone, with the first p

The smallest, lightest "pro" camera rig & digital darkroom ever?

large_David Cardinal mirrorless rig and digital darkroom.jpgThe drudgery of carrying lots of heavy, complex, gear is a bane for any type of photography that involves travel. Camera bodies, lenses, accessories, tripod, chargers, a laptop, and of course cables. Add the padded cases needed to safely stow all the gear and you've got anywhere from 30 to 70 pounds for just about any really serious photo travel.

So I'm always on the lookout for ways to make life simpler. This month I've assembled a new travel photo outfit that may set some records for how light and how small it is, while still allowing for "pro" grade photography. Now, I'm not recommending everyone junk what they have and go with it -- I'll talk about the shortcomings later -- but it is pretty amazing what is becoming possible. Read more »

Quick trick for when there just isn’t enough light to get your photograph

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Raw files are good for a lot of reasons, and one of the most useful is allowing you to make full use of your camera’s dynamic range after you take the shot. One place where this comes in handy is when you’re on the edge of having enough light to make an image. Perhaps you don’t have a tripod and your shutter speed is creeping down into motion blur territory, or you’re shooting in the near dark and already have your ISO up as high as you want to go. Read more »

Using Infrared to improve your color photos: Cutting through fog

Russian Ridge View in Fog with IR Layer OverlayInfrared is its own special kind of photography, and can provide plenty of really great images on its own. In addition to making great images of temples and landscapes, Infrared images can also be a tool to improve your color photographs. Currently the techniques in this article are a little advanced, and require some fairly specialized camera hardware, but if they catch on then it is only a matter of time before they are embedded in popular cameras and software solutions. In the meantime, for those willing to do some extra work, the result can be seemingly impossible photographs. Read more »